What is Applied Kinesiology?

Applied Kinesiology muscle testing, what is it?What is AK?

In 1964 Dr. George Goodheart was working on one of his patients who had a chronic shoulder problem. He examined the muscle that was responsible and with a little work it seemed to magically respond. Dr. Goodheart found that the patient’s inhibited (weak) muscle could be turned back on instantly if he knew what the cause of the problem was. This helped him to pinpoint the cause of the dysfunction and to bring about quick healing the toughest musculoskeletal  problems. This was the birth of Applied Kinesiology (AK).

Later Dr. Goodheart additionally learned that a facilitated (strong) muscles can also be used as an indicator. This is done by seeing what may temporarily weaken it. Fortunately this added another level to the possibilities for diagnosis and was a game changer. We now have more ways to investigate deeper, underlying health problems of all types quickly and efficiently. 

The original muscle testing method

Ok, maybe not original because there are records in ancient Egyptian Papyrus Ebers that date back to 1500 BC about muscles being related to energy meridians. So it seems that muscle testing may of been known in ancient times. Since Dr. Goodheart stumbled upon this phenomenon in 1964, many others have taken the idea of using a muscle test to get information about what is going on with the body. What sets AK and many of the other methods apart is the base of knowledge that has been accumulated. The basic AK program is developed as a post doctorate course. It is designed to apply what a health care professional has learned in school to muscle testing.

Applied kinesiology has taken information from many different heath disciplines. This body of knowledge is taught through the International College of Applied Kinesiology. With many different points of view on health being taught with muscle testing, a holistic approach toward a patient’s health is achieved.

For more information about learning Applied Kinesiology, click here.

This entry was posted in Every Day Muscle Testing, General thoughts, Patient education, Professional Applied Kinesiology and tagged , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.